NDPL Fall 2018 Newsletter

Dear Guest,

We hope you've been having a lovely Fall so far. We've certainly enjoyed the turning leaves in Massachusetts! This edition of our newsletter leads off with a groundbreaking dental stem cell human trial, and has plenty of other stem cell related news. Enjoy!

  • Regenerating Dental Tissue with Stem Cells from Baby Teeth
  • Stem Cells Tested on Mice with Alzheimer's Disease
  • Using Stem Cells to Treat Parkinson's Disease
  • NDPL's refer-a-friend program

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Regenerating dental tissue with stem cells from baby teeth

Regenerating dental tissue with stem cells from baby teeth  


In a successful Phase 1 clinical trial in China, researchers have shown that there may be a new way of addressing childhood dental trauma that leads to a ‘dead tooth’. The research team was jointly led by Songtao Shi of the University of Pennsylvania and Yan Jin, Kun Xuan, and Bei Li of the Fourth Military Medicine University in China. The team successfully transplanted stem cells from baby teeth into the injured teeth of children, which regenerated dental pulp in the injured teeth. Impressively, the newly generated dental pulp contained..

   

Stem Cells Tested on Mice with Alzheimer’s Disease   


Researchers at the University of Michigan (UM) are testing the effectiveness of transplanted stem cells on mice with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). After implanting human neural stem cells into the brains of affected mice, they saw improvement in recognition, spatial memory and learning.The research team, led by Dr. Eva Feldman, reported..

Stem Cells Tested on Mice with Alzheimer’s Disease
   
Stem cells to treat Parkinson’s disease
Stem Cells to Treat Parkinson's Disease

Japanese researchers announced that they have begun a clinical trial using stem cells to treat Parkinson’s disease (PD).  The scientists re-engineered skin cells from an anonymous donor, causing them to revert to cells with a pluripotent state, called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). In this state, stem cells can morph into a variety of cell types, including neural cells. Although this trial used donor cells, iPS cells can also be derived from the patient’s own cells, including dental pulp stem cells. 
   

NDPL's 'Refer-a-friend' program


NDPL makes it easy to refer a friend! Whether its a friend with a child going through the process of losing their primary teeth, or a family member who may need their wisdom teeth extracted– simply fill out the form below, and each of your referrals will receive information about National Dental Pulp Laboratory via e-mail. Once your referral enrolls and we store their cells, you’ll receive a $100 Visa gift card!

NDPL refer-a-friend